Category Archives: Care & Questions

What To Expect: The BFFL Co Guide to Mastectomy

AngelinaJolieHollywood star Angelina Jolie was a brave inspiration to all of those women dealing with a BRCA mutation or family history when she announced the startling news of her prophylactic double mastectomy. Most recently “Good Morning America” correspondent Amy Robach announced to viewers that she, too, would soon undergo a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. Due to advances in screening and genetic counseling/testing, women have options and information to help them make decisions. When pre-emptive or diagnosed early, women have a much better chance to be cured or avoid the disease.

While making the decision or told you need to have surgery is the biggest step, women still need help in preparing and recovering from these new surgeries.

We at BFFL Co are pleased to share with you The BFFL Co Guide to Mastectomy, an (more…)

Hospital Checklist and Birthplan for Expectant Moms

PregnantwomanlaptopOur handy hospital checklist and birthplan will keep you organized and prepared for childbirth.

Print it out, and use the checklist for packing. Fill in the birth plan to pack in your Mommy/Delivery BFFLBag®.

To download, click here.

The Monthly Breast Self-Exam

Click here for instructions on how to do a monthly breast self-exam. Don’t forget to get a mammogram annually, if you’re over 40, or every three years, if you’re between the ages of 30 and 40. More frequent screening is recommended for women with high risk because of family history or other reasons.

click here for instructions in Spanish.

Taking Care of Your Drains

Drain Care Instructions

Proper care of your JP drains is essential. You must regularly empty the bulbs so that they drain the fluid accumulating at the surgical site. The white portion (a) of the drain is inside your body. The long, clear tube (b) exits your body and is attached to your skin by several stitches. Do not yank or pull the tube away from your body or you will tear the stitches, and simply put, it hurts! Suction created by the bulb (c) pulls the fluid from the surgical site into the bulb’s reservoir. In order to function properly, the bulb should be collapsed in the middle so it looks like a deflated ball. As fluid collects, the bulb will expand and become a sphere again. For the first 3-4 days, the fluid will be bloody or serosanguinous (blood plus serous fluid). This is normal. Over the next 5-7 days, output of fluid into the bulb will slow down and become straw-colored.

(more…)

Questions and Answers For Breast Patients

Here are answers to some commonly asked questions and answers about mastectomy or lumpectomy and recovery.

Please feel free to email questions to: info@bfflco.com

Q. When will I be able to pick up or hug my children?

A. Well, you can hug your children right away, just make sure that they know not to squeeze too hard.  Hugs reduce recovery time.

Many young mothers worry about the day-to-day care of their little children after surgery– lifting a child out of a crib or bath, putting them into a car seat.  Any activity that engages the pectorals (chest) muscles should be minimized  for at least 6 weeks after surgery, maybe longer, depending on reconstruction.  Children learn to rely on a  well placed stool, take assistance from an older sibling or take their bath at a time of day when someone else might assist .

(more…)

How to Milk a JP Drain